Biden Administration Reaches New Low

1143

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg has allegedly been on paid vacation for months as the United States grapples with a historical distribution network crisis that is wreaking havoc on people’s lives.

SPECIAL: Get Your FREE Red Trump 2024 Hat Here


Do They Even Care?

This is outrageous, considering the nature of the issue at hand. The Biden administration’s lack of care over the country’s problems is hitting home with everyday Americans.

“In recent days, the usually ubiquitous Transportation Secretary was lying low while U.S. ports battled anchor-to-anchor congestion and lawmakers nearly melted down over the administration’s infrastructure program,” Politico said.

“Buttigieg’s staff told the West Wing that the official was on paid vacation since mid-August to spend some time with his husband, Chasten, and their two young infants,” according to the report.

Buttigieg was “largely inactive” during the “first four weeks,” according to a department official, except for “important agency choices and things that could not be outsourced.” Buttigieg will “keep taking considerable time over the upcoming weeks to help his husband and start taking care of his new children,” according to the spokesperson.

In a letter to Breitbart News on Thursday evening, GOP Sen. Marsha Blackburn criticized Buttigieg, saying he’s staying home when we’re in the midst of a transportation crisis. In the meantime, cargo ships are still unable to unload, and shops are bare.

The lawmaker said Buttigieg must return to work or resign from the Transportation Department. It’s past time to prioritize American families. Buttigieg’s departure came as a $1 trillion pipeline of commodities from Asia to the United States has been jammed for months.

This has resulted in increased shipping costs and rising inflation in an industry failing to recover under President Biden’s government.


Things Will Only Get Worse

The supply chain interruptions, according to a new assessment from Moody’s Analytics, “will get much worse before they can get better.”

As the worldwide financial recovery gains traction, it is becoming increasingly clear how this will be impeded by supply shocks that are already appearing around every corner,” according to this week’s study.

“Border checks and mobility limitations, the lack of a global vaccination pass, and pent-up desires from being kept at home have conspired to create a perfect storm. This perfect storm will have global output impeded by late delivery.”

Therefore, costs will rise and global growth will be less robust. The lack of lorry drivers, discrepancies in how nations are combating the pandemic, and a lack of a worldwide effort to simplify operations are all blamed in the research.

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon said on Monday, “next year, this will not be a problem at all. It’s the worst part of it. I believe that excellent market systems, like companies, will ultimately adjust to it.”